// NEW MONEY \\ 1.27.22 // Kill Rock Stars \\

  

A Decade Ago…

I want to take a moment to publicly thank Kendall Clawson, Sam Adams, Bob Speltz, Judge Kemp, Robert Goman, LeAnn Locher, Anne Viola-Krause, Tim Healea, Paul Fukui, Glenn Goodfellow, Neola Young, Nash Jones, Karen Petersen, Stacey Rice, Susan Kocen, Noah Wood, Dede Willis, Heather Nichelle, Ali Williams, Mary Emily O’Hara, Brian Charles Johnson, and all the other countless, caring, compassionate people who have bravely stepped up over the years to found, fund, build, sustain and, several times, fight to save the vital community resource that Q Center was designed to be.

Despite smoke and mirrors from my record label at the time, when I came to Q Center in 2010 I had nothing. Less than nothing, actually. I was traumatized by violence, was recently in recovery from a 16 year addiction to crack and alcohol which had left me ravaged physically and emotionally, had been freshly divorced while simultaneously being chewed up and spit out by the music industry, and I was living in a stranger’s converted garage. I was completely broke, starving, freezing at night, and, frankly, wanted to die.

One afternoon I found myself at Q Center and for the first time (maybe ever), I felt safe. I belonged. No one cared that I was broken. No one was scared of my need. In fact, they didn’t even see me as those things. They only cared that I was alive and that I was there — because that’s what family does.

Kendall invited me to come back the next day, so I did. When I got there, I told her I wanted to cancel my tour midway through, fire my team, turn my album into a fundraiser for the center, and keep showing up as long as I could be of use — and that’s what happened. I felt useful for the first time in years, and I stayed for the next 5 years.

While many of us have gone on to become successful after our time at Q Center, the truth is that none of us had much of anything back then — but we always had each other; And the people who did have resources gave everything they had to build a home for our community.

We fought for each other. We loved each other. We protected each other. And, most importantly, we created the first safe space many of us had ever experienced. We did all of this together, brick by brick, dollar by dollar, as a community, using our blood, sweat, intentions, and tears as the mortar.

When I literally had no food in my fridge and was too “famous” and ashamed to ask for help, Kendall fed me. I know she also had very little back then, but her care and concern for me and for all of our communities was always front and center. There were many days where the only food I ate was what was leftover at the end of the night after Q Center events, and I know I was not the only queer or trans person having their basic needs met within those walls, because I was often the one wrapping up to-go meals for other hungry queer and trans people.

Q Center saved my life, and it has saved countless others. This Portland Pride weekend, I’m using several copies of The Oregonian as a potty pad for my dog, and I’m celebrating Kendall and all of the people who made this big, gay, community magic possible to begin with — from founding board members and donors, to volunteers and program participants, to staff and community partners along the way.

I SEE YOU.
🌈❤️

Logan Lynn and Gino Mari Release Charity Single for Pride Month in Support of Pulse Orlando Families and Survivors. OUT NOW.

Logan Lynn by Ray Gordon (2016) - 2

On Saturday I woke up to the news of singer Christina Grimmie being gunned down and killed at a meet and greet with fans after her show. On Sunday I woke up to the news of extreme LGBT violence by way of the deadliest shooting in U.S. history.

I feel sick and afraid. I want to cancel all of my upcoming public appearances and find a closet to go back inside of. But I cannot. And I will not. I will not be made quiet by fear. I will not let American apathy dictate my path. And I will never stop hoping that change will come. Never. At times like this it’s important to remember that somewhere in the world, good is still happening. Cute, simple things are still real during ugly, complicated days.

I wrote this song “Go There When You Want To Be Loved” about my own feeling that there is no safe place for me in the world at times as a gay man, as a person living with persistent mental health struggles, and as a public person known for both. These lyrics feel like the only words I can find for how I am feeling, so I am releasing it now as a fundraiser for my queer family in Orlando.

Keep laughing. Keep kissing. Keep dancing. Keep loving each other. Keep fighting for your place in the world. Gay is great and so are you.

100% of the proceeds of this single will go to support recovery efforts in Orlando’s LGBT community. Click HERE to purchase your copy.

Happy Pride 2015 from Logan Lynn and The Portland Mercury

Portland Mercury Queer Issue 2015 - Logan Lynn
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Oregon Wins Marriage Equality!

Marriage Equality in Oregon (Photo by The Oregonian - May 19th 2014)

Now that marriage is won in Oregon, I am really excited for the LGBTQ community (and our allies) to get back to the still very pressing work of making schools safer, ending workplace discrimination, bringing cultural competency to systems which oppress us, building bridges with communities of faith who oppose us, pushing trans rights to the forefront of our agenda, and making sure our growing senior population is honored and celebrated, having paved the way for all of these modern victories so many years ago.

Celebrate tonight, friends — because tomorrow the work continues.

To find the LGBTQ Community Center nearest you to get involved and support this community, click HERE. In Oregon, click HERE to connect with Q Center.

(Photo: The Oregonian)





 

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