LOGAN LYNN // NEW MONEY \\ 1.21.22

  

Happy One Year Anniversary to Me and Portugal. The Man!

I joined Team PTM officially 12 months ago this week and we’ve been on a rad organizational development journey together ever since.

So proud to be part of PTM Foundation and have never felt more inspired by a group of people than I do with this band, board, and our community partners.

Thank you all! I love you. 🤘

.gay Domain Delayed Due to Coronavirus

As is happening across the globe, the official general availability launch of DotGay is being delayed.

From April 1, 2020 to August 31st, 2020 .gay names will instead be made available FREE to LGBTQ organizations, community groups, individuals, or small businesses looking for ways to foster digital Pride. We have a limited number of .gay names that we can activate early and we cannot imagine a better use for them. Our team will work with you to secure a .gay name and will waive all associated fees and help to get you online free of charge.

If you are interested in this, send an email to Press@TopLevel.Design and we’ll get you all set up.

🌈❤️

A Decade Ago…

I want to take a moment to publicly thank Kendall Clawson, Sam Adams, Bob Speltz, Judge Kemp, Robert Goman, LeAnn Locher, Anne Viola-Krause, Tim Healea, Paul Fukui, Glenn Goodfellow, Neola Young, Nash Jones, Karen Petersen, Stacey Rice, Susan Kocen, Noah Wood, Dede Willis, Heather Nichelle, Ali Williams, Mary Emily O’Hara, Brian Charles Johnson, and all the other countless, caring, compassionate people who have bravely stepped up over the years to found, fund, build, sustain and, several times, fight to save the vital community resource that Q Center was designed to be.

Despite smoke and mirrors from my record label at the time, when I came to Q Center in 2010 I had nothing. Less than nothing, actually. I was traumatized by violence, was recently in recovery from a 16 year addiction to crack and alcohol which had left me ravaged physically and emotionally, had been freshly divorced while simultaneously being chewed up and spit out by the music industry, and I was living in a stranger’s converted garage. I was completely broke, starving, freezing at night, and, frankly, wanted to die.

One afternoon I found myself at Q Center and for the first time (maybe ever), I felt safe. I belonged. No one cared that I was broken. No one was scared of my need. In fact, they didn’t even see me as those things. They only cared that I was alive and that I was there — because that’s what family does.

Kendall invited me to come back the next day, so I did. When I got there, I told her I wanted to cancel my tour midway through, fire my team, turn my album into a fundraiser for the center, and keep showing up as long as I could be of use — and that’s what happened. I felt useful for the first time in years, and I stayed for the next 5 years.

While many of us have gone on to become successful after our time at Q Center, the truth is that none of us had much of anything back then — but we always had each other; And the people who did have resources gave everything they had to build a home for our community.

We fought for each other. We loved each other. We protected each other. And, most importantly, we created the first safe space many of us had ever experienced. We did all of this together, brick by brick, dollar by dollar, as a community, using our blood, sweat, intentions, and tears as the mortar.

When I literally had no food in my fridge and was too “famous” and ashamed to ask for help, Kendall fed me. I know she also had very little back then, but her care and concern for me and for all of our communities was always front and center. There were many days where the only food I ate was what was leftover at the end of the night after Q Center events, and I know I was not the only queer or trans person having their basic needs met within those walls, because I was often the one wrapping up to-go meals for other hungry queer and trans people.

Q Center saved my life, and it has saved countless others. This Portland Pride weekend, I’m using several copies of The Oregonian as a potty pad for my dog, and I’m celebrating Kendall and all of the people who made this big, gay, community magic possible to begin with — from founding board members and donors, to volunteers and program participants, to staff and community partners along the way.

I SEE YOU.
🌈❤️

Logan Lynn, Jay Mohr, Sheila Hamilton, the Cast of “Last Meal” and Others at the 2017 Black & Gold Gala (PHOTOS + VIDEO)

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This year’s Black & Gold Gala in support of children’s mental health programs in Oregon was a huge success!

Thank you to all of our sponsors for your generosity, to The Nines Hotel for being every kind of perfect I can think of, to Swaim Strategies for always nailing it, to my team for being the best around, and to each and every one of you who showed up to support our cause with your time, talent and treasure. My heart is full! ❤️

Check out video from the red carpet here:



Check out photos from the party here: Read the rest of this entry »

Logan Lynn Named Chief Communications Officer at Trillium, Oregon’s Largest Provider of Mental and Behavioral Healthcare for Children and Families

Logan Lynn by Eric Sellers and Zaq Banton (2015)
Read the rest of this entry »

Logan Lynn Accepts Position as Communications Director for Trillium Family Services

Logan Lynn by Chase Person (2014)

All of you who follow me know that I am passionate about mental health — particularly around destigmatizing issues of trauma and addiction.

For the past 4.5 years I have been doing LGBTQ advocacy and communications work with Q Center in Portland, and I am pleased to announce that I have accepted a position as Communications Director for Trillium Family Services, Oregon’s largest provider of mental & behavioral healthcare for children and families.  Click HERE for the full scoop.

My mental health advocacy journey continues, and I hope you will join me in supporting both of these amazing organizations as I embark on this new adventure with you all! Thanks to everyone who has been posting sweet things and flooding my inbox with messages since the announcement.

I love you, too!

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Logan Lynn Cover Story and Interview in July Issue of HIM Magazine

Logan Lynn in HIM Magazine - July 2014 Issue

I’m one of the cover stories in the July issue of HIM Magazine, which just came out yesterday. We talk about everything from music and love, to growing up in a non-affirming Christian church, to surviving the violence of my youth and the near-fatal addiction (and triumph over said addiction) which followed.

Read the interview online HERE or you can read the full transcript below.

From HIM Magazine (July 2014 Issue):

Him Magazine July 2014 Edition

“From Preacher’s Kid to Pop Artist: An Interview with Gay Musician Logan Lynn”
By Dominique Robbins
(Photos by Adrian Sotomayor Photography and Leonard Martin Hughet)

Logan Lynn is an American singer, songwriter, and producer. His music pushes the boundaries of what we call “pop” and it challenges us to look inside ourselves and find that person within. His latest album “Tramp Stamps and Birthmarks” give us a little glimpse of who Logan is as an artist and as a human being. With songs like “Turn Me Out” which focuses on his sexual side and even his cover of “Nobody Knows the Trouble I’ve Seen” which gives us a glimpse of his singing background growing up in church, it is safe to say that Logan is well rounded and well brought up. Growing up a Preacher’s kid with a dad who had an on the road ministry to being Read the rest of this entry »

Logan Lynn Interviewed on Out Loud Radio This Week! Listen Here.

Hey folks! I was the guest on Out Loud Radio this week chatting about life, love, music, activism, the church, and a whole bunch of other really gay stuff.

Have a listen HERE or download the MP3 of the show HERE.

xo
LL


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